Resonant Leadership

The career field of dance offers young men and women the opportunity to advance to professional contracts by the age of sixteen. For a dancer to accomplish this goal and have a fulfilling career he must be trained to be focused. The lifespan of his career includes being a catalyst for change, applying the excellence of his formal training beyond the stage, and strategizing to help the art form advance beyond himself.  On this journey, he will have to apply the stamina he learned in dance class. A dancer who is resonant in their career has been flexible, learned the art of relationships, and was conscious about planting seeds for the future.

7Catalyst for Change

Pre-professional dance studies begin between the ages of six and eight.  A young dancer learns he must be fifteen to twenty minutes early to be on time and his uniform and hygiene must be pristine for the instructor to accept him into class.  The beginning of the young dancer’s career includes being a catalyst for change and his preparedness will help him be flexible when encountering adversity. Dancers who begin their career with rigid expectations will face resistance and may produce environments that cultivate a fear of confrontation. By working to grasp concepts quickly and placing them into an analytical network of associations he can adjust for organizational needs. He must use his charisma and flexibility together for resonant leadership.

Embracing change is a munificent theme.  The research of Barton and Collura (2003) indicates all a student’s needs can be accessed through laptop computers. A young dancer entering the professional workplace may not have the same ideals.  His value-driven approach is to attain excellence in all areas and may leave co-workers feeling judged.  His nimbleness, adaptability, and ability to adjust on the fly is an asset according to Denning (2008). Young dancers in the workplace often create a revolution of change. “Continuing the management practices and structures of the lumbering industrial giants of the 20th Century is no longer a viable option for today’s firms” (Denning, 2008, p.3).  The young contracted dancer’s childlike optimism has more opportunity to be helpful now than in years past.

The brilliance of an uncomplicated hard worker may be considered a threat or an asset by others.  His dedication to professionalism and detail will turn heads of leaders and co-workers. Because the start of the young dancer’s career includes being a catalyst for change, his preparedness can help him be flexible when encountering workplace hardships. His rigid expectations must be stretched to avoid an environment that promotes fear of confrontation. Adjusting persona to identify with organizational prototypicality will help his appeal to co-workers and employers.  Resonance is created by the dancer who uses optimistic flexibility.

Excellence in Relationships

The dancer’s discontinuity of understanding consequences by entering the workforce at a young age will lead him to consider personal changes. His ability for physical self-control begins to balance his ability to practice optimism instead of critique and criticism. The dancer begins applying the excellence of his formal dance training beyond the stage and into the art of relationships. The interpersonal discoveries of working together with a team help him to be skilled at collaboration.  Learning about emotional intelligence helps him pay attention to leaders’ and coworkers’ feelings and behaviors. When the enthusiastic dancer commits himself to excellence in applying emotional intelligence in his relationships the result is resonant leadership.

The appreciation for beauty and excellence have positive associations with prosociality and well-being (Martínez-Martí, Hernández-Lloreda, & Avia, 2016).  Young dancers can view themselves as autonomous because they learn command of their personal space.  A dancer working in a professional company must surrender his weight-bearing trust to his colleagues and begin to understand he not only lifts others but there will be times when they bear his weight with gracefulness. The Bible asks each person to focus on “whatever is true, whatever is noble, whatever is right, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is admirable—if anything is excellent or praiseworthy—think about such things” (Philippians 4:8). His long-term reputation and integrity are revealed in his ability to apply this scripture with the same interpersonal excellence as his trade.

Original disjointedness will eventually break way to personal change and commitment. The dancer’s capacity for internal and external sanguinity surpasses the desire for critical analysis of others. He begins applying the excellence of his formal dance training into the art of relational affairs. The social discoveries of collaboration raise the standard for new ground rules that demonstrate respect for others.  Emotional standards and boundaries are recognizable to him as he develops. When the passionate dancer commits himself to excellence in relationships resonance will occur.

Strategy for Mentoring

The organizational reality of a dancer’s career is most often spread thin between sub-contracted engagements. Identifying the important elements of an evolving art form requires discovering the truth about the dancer’s connection to the audience. The lifespan of his career includes strategizing to help the art form advance beyond himself by planting seeds for the future. The visionary component must develop for the dancer to put systems into place that support his successful habits and ways of mentoring an audience and student body.  The planted seed will grow a career with resonance.

The international stage for dance remains small and intimately connected. The dancer’s trajectory is to detect the compatible technical schools of dance and deliver his gained artistry to young students. Behar-Horenstein and Prikhidko (2017) support that atmospheres of collaboration encourage the capacity for technical thinking. The emotional climate of the school must also be compatible on a visceral level to the artist and audience.  If the school is compatible with the artist only his seeds will only produce a technical success in young dancers.  When the school is compatible with the artist and the audience he will tap into the collective hope that the artform releases beauty and grace with forward momentum.

The logistics of a dancer’s profession is managing business networks. His contribution to an evolving art form necessitates determining the genuine product beyond the passionate choreography.  Articulating the connection of the performance to the audience is vital. The acceptance of his occupation includes strategizing to help the art form advance beyond himself by planting seeds for the future. The quixotic component must develop for the dancer to put structures into place that help identify and mentor key individuals with trade secrets.  The values of the audience and student body help classify the critical artistic components that will help him nurture resonance in leading others to make beautiful and grace-filled choreography.

Strategy for Mentoring

The job of a professional dancer opens to young men and women earlier than most careers. For the dancer to have a rewarding career he must cultivate intense concentration. The lifespan of his career includes being a catalyst for change, applying the excellence of his formal training beyond the stage, and strategizing to help the art form advance beyond himself.  His stamina must be sustainable. A dancer who is resonant in his career has been flexible, learned the art of relationships, and was conscious about planting seeds for the future.

 

 

 

 

References

Barton, C., & Collura, K. (2003). Catalyst for change. T.H.E. Journal31(4), 39-41.

Behar-Horenstein, L. S., & Prikhidko, A. (2017). Exploring mentoring in the context of team science. Mentoring & Tutoring: Partnership In Learning25(4), 430-454.

Denning, S. (2018). Succeeding in an increasingly agile world. Strategy & Leadership46(3), 3.

Martínez-Martí, M., Hernández-Lloreda, M., & Avia, M. (2016). Appreciation of beauty and excellence: Relationship with personality, prosociality and well-being. Journal Of Happiness Studies17(6), 2613-2634.

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